Monday, September 26, 2016

Briskeye: three 360 cameras with 4k livestreaming for industrial and commercial use

photo by Briskeye
Briskeye makes three types of fully spherical 360-degree cameras with 4k livestreaming capability, for industrial and commercial use.


Here is a video about Briskeye:



Here is some more info about Briskeye's products:

BRISKEYE AXL BODY-WORN
Briskeye AXL Body-Worn is touted as the world's first body-worn 360 degree camera.  (But check out the Samsung AME concept).  It uses three lenses paired with a large 1/2-inch CMOS sensor and with a global shutter, and can output a bitrate of 50mbps.  Photos and videos are stitched in the cloud.  It can livestream at up to 3600×1800 @ 25fps to any device with a web browser.  It has a 32GB SD card for storage (you can also record using an external storage for your browser-equipped device).
Here is sample video with the Briskeye Body-Worn.
Other features: Photo resolution is up to 3600 x 1800.  It is water resistant and rated at IP65. It has USB 3.0, Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections.

BRISKEYE X
Briskeye X is a 360-degree camera for vehicles.  It uses three lenses and the same sensor as the Body Worn.  However, the bitrate is up to 60 mbps, and the livestream video resolution is up to 3600×1800 @ 30fps.  In Q4 2016, Briskeye will upgrade the resolution to an incredible 7200 x 3600 @ 30fps, and the photo resolution to 7200 x 3600.
Other specifications are similar to those of the Body Worn, including the IP65 water resistance, except that the internal storage is 120GB.
Here is a sample video with Briskeye X.


BRISKEYE PRO
Briskeye Pro is Briskeye's camera for broadcasters and studios.  The lenses and specs are similar to those of the Briskeye X except that it is not water resistant, and the 120GB internal storage can be upgraded to 2TB.  As with the Briskeye X, the Briskeye Pro resolution will be upgraded to 7200 x 3600 @ 30fps, and photo resolution to 7200 x 3600.
Here is a sample video with Briskeye Pro.

Here is the official website for Briskeye.  Thank you very much to Roman Goldman for bringing this to my attention!